How To Start & Grow Your Business

Four Awkward Questions to Remove from Your Sales Script

From the Editor's Desk
Sep 17th, 2015
  • Estimated reading time: 2 min read
  • Hummy's
    Highlights

    1Certain leading questions feel manipulative. 2Indirectly get an idea of their budget without asking. 3Don't put gatekeepers on the defensive.
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Sales Scripts

Confused Way Of A Businessman with intersecting highways Photo Credit: alphaspirit Bigstock.com

Selling over the phone is already a tenuous situation. You only have a short amount of time to demonstrate that engaging with you is worth your prospect’s time. It’s important to recognize any phrases or questions that might be counterproductive so you can eliminate them from your sales script.

Belinda Summers shares four questions that tend to turn customers off, in her article on Business 2 Community.

1. “Would you agree? “– People are used to these types of sales techniques by now and have their guard up. When they hear this question they may feel you are trying to manipulate their thinking, getting them into a pattern of agreement. Summers suggests a better way to connect is to focus instead on your prospect’s needs. Ask questions that get them talking about their business and its highest priorities.

2. “If I can save you 20% on total costs, would you be interested in…” Again, this tactic feels like walking into a trap. In this one, you’re presenting a hypothetical condition under which they are forced to say they would do business with you–awkward. Besides, until they’ve shown strong interest in your product or service, offering a discount can come across as pushy.

3. “Do you have the budget to purchase our services?” – This question is well-intentioned, but it can be perceived as personally offensive to the recipient. Instead of putting your prospect on the spot by investigating the scope of his or her purchasing power, Summers says you will get much more information with an open-ended question like this: “Tell me more about your process of purchase decisions.”

4. “Are you the main decision-maker?” – Of course in sales we all want to find out right away if we’re dealing directly with the decision-maker, but there are better ways of figuring that out besides challenging the authority of the person you’re speaking with. A reasonable question that can naturally come out during the course of your conversation would be, “Who are the main stakeholders in the company?”

To read the original article in its entirety, please visit Business 2 Community.

About the Author

From the Editor's Desk

This article was written by a bizHUMM Staff Writer. We aim to provide practical tips that help solve your burning small business questions. If you have any suggestions or ideas for articles, please email them to: editor@bizhumm.com